Can you please tell me a bit about President Election of 1876?

The United States presidential election of 1876 was one of the most disputed and controversial presidential elections in American history. Samuel J. Tilden of New York outpolled Ohio’s Rutherford B. Hayes in the popular vote, and had 184 electoral votes to Hayes’s 165, with 20 votes uncounted. These 20 electoral votes were in dispute in three states: Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina; each party reported its candidate had won the state, while in Oregon one elector was declared illegal (as an "elected or appointed official") and replaced. The 20 disputed electoral votes were ultimately awarded to Hayes after a bitter legal and political battle, giving him the victory.
An informal deal was struck to resolve the dispute: the Compromise of 1877. In return for the Democrats’ acquiescence in Hayes’s election, the Republicans agreed to withdraw federal troops from the South, ending Reconstruction. The Compromise effectively ceded power in the Southern states to the Democratic Redeemers.
This was the first presidential election in 24 years in which the Democratic candidate won a majority of the popular vote. This was also the first, and so far only, election in the history of the United States in which a candidate received an absolute majority of the popular vote (more than 50 percent) and was not elected President by the Electoral College, and one of only four elections in which the person receiving a plurality of the popular vote lost the electoral vote.

 

4 Responses to “Can you please tell me a bit about President Election of 1876?”

  1. Cit Cat says:

    The United States presidential election of 1876 was one of the most disputed and controversial presidential elections in American history. Samuel J. Tilden of New York outpolled Ohio’s Rutherford B. Hayes in the popular vote, and had 184 electoral votes to Hayes’s 165, with 20 votes uncounted. These 20 electoral votes were in dispute in three states: Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina; each party reported its candidate had won the state, while in Oregon one elector was declared illegal (as an "elected or appointed official") and replaced. The 20 disputed electoral votes were ultimately awarded to Hayes after a bitter legal and political battle, giving him the victory.
    An informal deal was struck to resolve the dispute: the Compromise of 1877. In return for the Democrats’ acquiescence in Hayes’s election, the Republicans agreed to withdraw federal troops from the South, ending Reconstruction. The Compromise effectively ceded power in the Southern states to the Democratic Redeemers.
    This was the first presidential election in 24 years in which the Democratic candidate won a majority of the popular vote. This was also the first, and so far only, election in the history of the United States in which a candidate received an absolute majority of the popular vote (more than 50 percent) and was not elected President by the Electoral College, and one of only four elections in which the person receiving a plurality of the popular vote lost the electoral vote.
    References :

  2. followpol says:

    CitCat was absolutely correct. If you want more information, a book was written about it, called "Fraud of the Century: Stolen Election of 1876" by Roy Morris. I read it from the Chicago Public Library.
    References :

Leave a Reply