Since my first question was not clear, I am asking it again. I realize that the Electoral College actually votes for President, and the Popular vote is not what counts. My question is, when did the Popular Elections start? Who was the first President that there was a popular vote taken for?

From the beginning Article Two clause 2 of the Constitution
The Electoral College elected Washington unanimously in 1789, and again in the 1792 election

Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.

 

5 Responses to “When was the first popular election for President held in the United States?”

  1. Lillian says:

    None since we’ve had a Constitution. Perhaps before the constitution, but none since.
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  2. Tim G says:

    I believe 1828, after Andrew Jackson got screwed in ’24, but I’m not sure. (By popular, I just mean an election where the people had a say)
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  3. Jacob W says:

    None. Before the Electoral College, the Senate selected the President and the Vice President.

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  4. fangtaiyang says:

    George Washington was the first president elected by both popular and electoral votes. He is the only president that was elected unanimously. The popular vote at that time did not mean the same thing as it does today. The only people elligible to vote were white male landowners. Women did not vote until the early twentieth century and African slaves were not even classified as people for voting purposes.
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  5. hazard to your heath says:

    From the beginning Article Two clause 2 of the Constitution
    The Electoral College elected Washington unanimously in 1789, and again in the 1792 election

    Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or Person holding an Office of Trust or Profit under the United States, shall be appointed an Elector.
    References :

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